Pre-Paid Plans vs Legal Insurance

It is not uncommon to see the terms “legal plans” and “pre-paid legal services” used interchangeably. While they share a lot of characteristics in common, there are a number of differences you should be aware of. Both of these terms refer to an arrangement whereby you pay a fixed monthly or yearly fee in exchange for legal services. The idea behind them is to save consumers on high legal fees whilst offering a valuable service. That’s where the differences lie: what kind of service is offered and what is covered. What are you entitled to in both schemes?

Pre-paid services cover for specific legal services: free phone consultation and advice, drafting of simple wills and trusts, review of sample contracts and writing of letters on your behalf. Legal services not provided will get charged at regular attorney fees, but you may be eligible for discounts.

Legal insurance, by contrast, works much like other insurance plans, like health or car insurance. Although specific legal services are offered at times, your insurance provider will typically offer a policy that covers for all legal services. The policy will pay on behalf of you, the policy holder, or reimburse all expenses, costs or fees that you pay for legal services up to the policy limit. For instance, your policy might reimburse any fees incurred in your court judgments or pay your bail money – a service not provided by most pre-paid legal plans. Your legal insurance is also pegged to other insurance policies you may already have. If you run into legal problems involving your other insurance, then your legal insurance policy will protect you against loss or liability. For instance, if you are involved in a car accident when your auto-insurance has already run out and you are subsequently sued for recovery of damages, you will be protected by a legal plan insurance.

Collaborative Divorce — breaking up doesn’t have to mean breaking the bank

The collaborative process, started by Minneapolis family lawyer Stuart Webb in 1990, provides alternative dispute resolution using a team of professionals working jointly for the couple, rather than in adversarial roles. It is just now hitting the radar screen in Illinois, where practitioners estimate that about 300 divorces have been handled this way in the last several years. The state averages about 35,000 divorces a year, records show.

Both parties agree not to enter litigation. Couples often hire attorneys trained in collaborative law and bring in shared accountants, financial planners, business valuation experts, child psychologists and even life coaches to help the couple. Unlike impartial mediators, the attorneys can advise their clients as advocates.

Proponents say it dramatically cuts the tension–and the costs–involved in traditional contested divorces.

Adjusting To Your Divorce

Parenting through divorce presents new and changing relationships for everyone. Adjusting to the process of letting go of the concept of the two-parent family and accepting the idea of new relationships takes time. Take the time to go slow when initiating a new relationship to give children time to deal with different lifestyles and eventually the possibility of an extended family. Rushing into dating may be viewed by your child as competition for your love and attention. Old fears of abandonment may surface as the fantasy dissolves that the divorcing parents will unite. As a result of the divorce, some children lose trust in adults and are slow to accept a new adult into their life. It is important to talk to your children about their feelings and their role in the new step-family. Communication, reassurance, and time will help your child make the needed adjustment.

Before dating, give your children enough time to adjust to the idea that mom and dad will be seeing other people. Make your activities with your date a part of a group function. Starting your social life with friends the children already know may also help them get the point that you are dating. In the beginning of a new relationship, meet your dates away from home to avoid having a number of different people in your home and your child’s life. Your child had lived through difficult changes and should not be asked to adjust to something else this significant unless it is necessary. Choose with care whom you let get close to your family. Before you introduce them, let your children know the nature of your relationship. Begin with a few short outings to take the pressure off forced conversation. If it looks as if the relationship will be long term, outings can gradually become longer. It is important to reassure your children of your love for them. They are less likely to accept someone they perceive as a threat to their relationship with you. It is crucial that they know that the person is not a replacement for their absent parent.

What a Litigation Lawyer Does

If you are facing a civil matter, you may need the assistance of a skilled litigation lawyer to help you through the process. Whether you simply have a few questions or concerns regarding your matter, or you need representation in court, you should schedule a consultation with one of these professionals in your area. Your case may involve a breach of contract, fraud, real estate matters, or business disputes. Not all cases are alike, and your situation may be very complex. So, what exactly will a litigation lawyer be able to do for you?

An attorney in this field works with lawsuits. These professionals concentrate specifically on taking cases to court. They can often settle these cases before they even reach the court, but in most situations, they will be responsible for arguing on the behalf of their clients in court. Some attorneys work on criminal litigation, while others work on civil cases. One of the most common types of civil case is personal injury. Personal injury attorneys represent clients who were injured on the job, or due to another party’s negligence. If you were injured because of another person’s careless actions, a personal attorney can help you to hold the responsible parties accountable.

Once you have hired a litigator to represent you, the professional will typically evaluate your case to determine whether or not you are eligible to file a lawsuit, if you are the plaintiff. If you are the defendant, the attorney will investigate possible evidence for your defense. In both cases, the investigation may include getting together evidence in the form of documents or statements from witnesses. In most scenarios, the attorneys will work to resolve the matter before going forward with the lawsuit. Most civil matters are resolved before ever going to court.

The Advantages of Seeking Legal Counsel in Dog Bite Claims

According to a survey conducted by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), more than 4.7 million people are bitten by dogs every year. Out of this staggering number, 1 out of 6 persons bitten suffer injuries that are serious enough to receive medical attention. The statistics are straightforward but they fail to capture the magnitude of pain experienced by victims of a dog attack. Experiencing a dog attack can be one of the most traumatic events to occur in a person’s life often leaving behind severe physical, emotional, and psychological scars. If you or a loved one is ever faced with dealing with a dog attack, it is important for you to know your rights as a victim and how seeking legal counsel can help your case.

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Dealing with Insurance Companies-Settling matters with an insurance adjuster can prove to be confusing and sometimes the result will not be in the best interest of the victim. If a settlement is reached, the victim runs the risks of receiving a lesser amount than if he or she hired an attorney.